From Moon Cookies To Martin and Me
…. Remembering Dr. King  . . . and much much more.

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In remembering the day Martin Luther King, Jr. died, African-American storyteller Lyn Ford recognizes how people of different backgrounds can share a vision for unity and peace. And as Americans seek to celebrate Martin Luther King Day in January, Lyn’s story also gives us an opportunity to explore the relationship between Dr. King and the Jewish people.
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As a little girl, Lyn Ford associated her neighbor Mrs. Rosenberg with the delicious “moon cookies” she would make, as well as her curious expressions like “oy vey.” And she was often moved by the foreign-sounding songs her neighbor would sing, although she never knew what the meaning was. Too young to know any different, Lyn mistook the series of numbers tattooed on Mrs. Rosenberg’s arm—the numbers that marked her as a survivor of the Holocaust—for her phone number.
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Years later, on April 5, 1968, the day after Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered, Lyn was reminded of the songs Mrs. Rosenberg used to sing. As white children and black children walked together in mourning, singing songs such as “We Shall Overcome,” she heard another voice singing the words of Mrs. Rosenberg’s Hebrew song, “…when we walk together in unity and peace.”
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Lyn’s story reminds us of the powerful bonds that can connect people of different backgrounds and faiths. As the  Amercan Civil Rights actions and movements of the 60s unfolded, African Americans and Jewish people came together to share a common deep longing for peace and justice.
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Most people are unaware of Martin Luther King’s strong relationship with the Jewish community; toward the end of his life, he devoted significant time and energy to strengthening what were becoming increasingly strained ties between black Americans and U.S. Jews. And American Jews were heavily involved in the Civil Rights Movement on behalf of African Americans. Many Jewish Americans, for example, went to Mississippi in 1964 to fight for civil rights in what became known as the “Freedom Summer.” Others helped register African American voters in various southern states. In June 1964, two Jews were murdered with one African-American after entering Mississippi to register black voters.
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The Civil Rights Era is full of stories like this: of people standing up for their beliefs in spite of hostility, aggression and, in many cases, violence. By defying her disapproving teachers and the white children who taunted her for leaving school that April day, Lyn Ford also stood up for what she believed in. And in song, she joined the millions of voices throughout history who, in so many different languages, have spoken up for justice and peace.
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See this video-story From Moon Cookies To Martin and Me by storyteller Lyn Ford :

From Moon Cookies To Martin and Me

(Please be patient as the video may take a few moments to load.)

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Watch Lyn Ford’s story Finding Josephus.   This is a short video story — rarely told — about the Underground Railroad. It is also about pride and dignity — yesterday and today.   You will also find many of the short video-stories on this site inspiring viewing around the January  national holiday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Finding Josephus.

(Please be patient as the video may take a few moments to load.)

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Many other lesson plans and resources on diversity themes can be found at : www.RaceBridgesStudio.com